Debates over the issue of homelessness have long been inflected by the circulation of concepts, experts and models through globalised policy networks. However, the way homelessness is known and acted upon as a domain of policy intervention remains geographically and temporally distinctive. This tension – between similarity and difference, relationality and territoriality, global and local – poses questions for how we understand the spatialised practices of policy-making. Where and how do policy ideas flow? What structures these flows? How are different types of actors involved? What is the role of territorially-embedded actors, events and histories? This research aims to answer questions like these in regard to homelessness policy and programming.

Conducted by Tom Baker (University of Auckland), this research focuses on the entanglement of homeless governance in global policy geographies.

 

Journal articles

Baker, T. and McGuirk, P. (forthcoming) ‘He came back a changed man’: The popularity and influence of policy tourism’. Area. [free version here]

Baker, T. and McGuirk, P. (2017) Assemblage thinking as methodology. Territory, Politics, Governance 5 (4): 425-442. [free version here, official version here]

Baker, T. and Evans, J. (2016) ‘Housing first’ and the changing terrains of homelessness governance. Geography Compass 10 (1): 25-41. [official version here]

Book chapters

Baker, T. and McGuirk, P. (forthcoming) Seeing is believing? Understanding policy tourism as an arena for policy circulation. In Baker, T. and Walker, C. (eds.) Public policy circulation: Arenas, agents, actions. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Baker, T. (2018) The medicalisation of homelessness. In Crooks, V., Andrews, G. and Pearce, J. (eds.), Routledge handbook of health geography. Abingdon: Routledge.