CROS & PIRLS – There’s still time to participate

Until Wednesday 5 April 2019, Northumbria is participating in two biennial national surveys of researchers, the Careers in Research Online Survey (CROS) and the Principal Investigators and Research Leaders Survey (PIRLS). These surveys gather important, anonymous data about working conditions, career aspirations and career development opportunities for research staff and research leaders in higher education institutions.

Eligible staff have been sent an email with a link to the relevant survey to learn about lucky leprechaun slot. The surveys are totally anonymous and confidential and analysis will be used to inform Northumbria’s researcher development training programmes and other activities in support of our research-active staff. They will also be used to benchmark us against the rest of the sector. Click on the links for more information about CROS and PIRLS or contact researchsupport@northumbria.ac.uk if you have any questions about the surveys.

 

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What do you think about evidence-based policy making?

We have received the following request from the Universities Programme Manager at the Houses of Parliament for views from researchers on evidence-based policy making. It focusses on an idea called the Evidence Information Service, aimed at rapidly connecting politicians with academics through parliamentary systems. If you are interested in finding out more about this initiative or contributing your views to it please read on:

Evidence Information Service

‘We are a group of academics from the Cardiff University, University of Exeter, University College London, University of Bath and the University of Bristol working with the House of Commons Library and the National Assembly for Wales Research Service to develop a UK Evidence Information Service (EIS).

‘The EIS will act as a rapid matchmaking and advisory service, working with existing UK parliamentary systems to connect politicians with the wider network of academics and professionals in science, technology, engineering, maths, medicine, humanities and the social sciences.

‘More details about the project can be found in our Guardian article and GW4 webpage.

‘We are seeking the confidential views of academics on their attitudes to and experiences of evidence-based policymaking, the usefulness of the EIS and their potential contribution.

 ‘We, therefore, invite all UK researchers in academia and industry to complete a 5-10 minute survey.

‘We would kindly ask that you distribute this email to your department/school.

‘For more information, please contact Lindsay Walker on walkerl7@cardiff.ac.uk.’

Houses of Parliament (CC by 2.0)

 

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BIS Launches Global Challenges Research Fund Survey

Globe by Simon Tong CC BY-SA-NC 2.0
Globe by Simon Tong CC BY-SA-NC 2.0

Yesterday BIS launched a call for evidence to inform the high level challenges which will form the basis of the funding calls for the Global Challenges Research Fund. We summarised what we know so far about the GCRF last week.

“We are looking for inputs from individuals and institutions across all academic disciplines, non-governmental organisations and industrial sectors both in and outside of the UK. Please alert colleagues who may wish to respond.

The results from the survey will be reviewed alongside other feedback. We will share a short summary of evidence we have collected and outline how that has informed our strategy in the autumn.”

This is your chance to have your say on how the programme should be steered. The survey is via an online webform and it closes on 22nd August.

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Survey on researchers’ views about open access publishing of research monographs

The following request for survey responses has been circulated from OAPEN-UK, an Arts and Humanities Research Council and JISC funded project exploring the issues impacting upon the publishing of scholarly monographs in the humanities and social sciences (HSS). The project is working with Taylor & Francis, Palgrave Macmillan, Berg Publishers, Liverpool University Press, University Wales Press, research funders and universities, to understand the challenges and steps required to move towards an open access publishing model for scholarly monographs. Further information on OAPEN-UK is available on the project website:

www.oapen-uk.jiscebooks.org

In an open access model, the monograph is made freely available – readers (or their libraries) do not have to pay to read it online, rather the costs of the publishing process (e.g.  peer review, typesetting, marketing) are recovered through alternative routes such as research grants, institutional funding or perhaps through readers purchasing print editions or particular formats for their iPad or Kindle. Various models are being tested at the moment.

OAPEN-UK has two strands: an open access pilot gathering data on the usage, sales and citations of 60 monographs, and a wider research project which explores the environment for open access publishing.

We’re six months into the project and, following a series of focus groups, have identified some key questions for researchers – both as authors and readers.

We invite you to complete the researcher survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/oapenukresearcher. The findings from this survey will combine with interviews and surveys of other stakeholder groups to help us understand the big issues and priorities that an open access publishing model must accommodate.

To thank you for your help, if you complete the survey you will be entered into a draw for Amazon vouchers – we have three £100 vouchers, three £50 vouchers and three £25 vouchers available to win.

If you’d like any further information, please contact Ellen Collins (ellen.collins@researchinfonet.org) or Caren Milloy (c.milloy@jisc-collections.ac.ukwww.jisc-collections.ac.uk). The OAPEN-UK website also contains more information about the project, and our findings so far.

Twitter: @oapenuk

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