REF 2021: Guidance Released

This afternoon HEFCE released the decisions on staff and outputs for REF 2021. Our very own Ruth Hattam was digesting the details over lunch and has come up with a useful bitesize summary. If that’s not enough REF for you you can always read the full thing (it’s only 19 pages): http://www.ref.ac.uk/media/ref,2021/downloads/REF%202017_04%20Decisions.pdf

  • All staff with significant responsibility for research are returned to REF provided they are independent researchers.  As expected, institutions not going with 100% submission will be able to determine the criteria for identifying staff with significant responsibility.  My reading of the guidance is that it will be possible to consider different criteria for different UoAs, although the rationale for all decisions will need to be captured in the Code of Practice (guidance summer 2018, provisional submission spring 2019).  Further guidance on significant responsibility criteria (determined in conjunction with main panels) will form part of the Guidance on submissions/Panel criteria – the final versions of which will not be available until January 2019.
  • Independent researcher criteria will build on REF 2014 definition and will be worked on with the main panels.
  • ORCID strongly encouraged by not mandated.
  • Average number of outputs is 2.5 per FTE submitted.
  • Minimum of one, maximum of 5 outputs per member of staff (this is a soft 5 with no limit on co-authored papers).  Staff can be returned with zero outputs through an individual circumstances process.  The unit of assessment can also make  case for ‘unit circumstances’ to reduce the overall number of outputs required.
  • Impact case studies will be 2 for up to 15 FTE, then one for each additional 15 FTE (up to 105 FTE when one additional per 50 FTE)
  • Staff census date is 31 July 2020.  Hefce intend to work with HESA ‘to enable close alignment between the information collected and the staff record and the submission requirements of REF.
  • Output portability is the simplified model (i.e. outputs can be returned at current and previous institution – with some caveats).  (85% of the 157 respondents supported this model).
  • The original Open Access requirement (i.e. deposit within 3 months of date of acceptance) will be implemented from April 2018, although there will be the opportunity to record exceptions when deposit is 3 months after publication.

 

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Open Access Week: A Fistful of Webinars

Open Access storefront by Gideon Burton CC BY-SA
Open Access storefront by Gideon Burton CC BY-SA

Did you know that Open Access Week is fast approaching? Dr. Tony Ross-Hellauer, Scientific Manager of the EU-funded OpenAIRE project, writes about some of the events taking place online to celebrate and support researchers and administrators:

“For this year’s 9th International Open Access Week, OpenAIRE has scheduled a full week of webinars on various exciting Open Science topics. During the week of October 24-30, join us at lunchtime (12.00 CEST) each day for key insights into the ethics and implementation of Open Science, especially as they relate to the EC’s Horizon2020 programme and OpenAIRE’s mission to foster the social and technical links that enable Open Science in Europe and beyond.

  • MONDAY: “The fundamentals of Open Science”, October 24, 2016 at 12.00 CEST, on key introductory themes in Open Science, with Tony Ross-Hellauer (OpenAIRE, University of Goettingen), Paola Masuzzo (Ghent University) and Chris Hartgerink (Tilburg University).
  • TUESDAY: “H2020 Open Access mandate for project coordinators and researchers”, October 25, 2016 at 12.00 CEST, on Open Access to publications in Horizon 2020, with Eloy Rodrigues and Pedro Principe (University of Minho).
  • WEDNESDAY: “Open Research Data in H2020 and Zenodo repository”, October 26, 2016 at 12.00 CEST, on Research Data Management in Horizon 2020 and the Zenodo repository functionalities, with Marjan Grootveld (DANS) and Krzysztof Nowak (CERN).
  • THURSDAY: “Policies for Open Science: webinar for research managers and policy makers”, October 27, 2016 at 12.00 CEST, on OpenAIRE’s policy activities building on the PASTEUR4OA project, and how to create/implement policies for open science at a local and national level, with Marina Angelaki and Alma Swan (PASTEUR4OA) and Tony Ross-Hellauer (OpenAIRE).
  • FRIDAY: “OpenAIRE guidelines and broker service for repository managers”, October 28, 2016 at 12.00 CEST, on Openaire compatibility guidelines and the dashboard for Repository Managers, with Pedro Principe (University of Minho) and Paolo Manghi (CNR/ISTI).

To participate in any (or all) of these webinars, please register here: https://goo.gl/HIcpJT

Northumbria University staff and PGRs should also note that Ellen Cole and I are jumping the gun a little bit on OA week this year and holding our own Understanding Open Access session on 19th October, 12-1pm at City Campus. You can find out more and book here.

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Law School Open Access drop-in on Thursday 26 November

Professor Chris Ashford and I will be running an Open Access drop-in on Thursday 26 November from 11-12 in thequestion by cesar bojorquez CC BY 2.0 CCE1 staff room. It will be an opportunity to ask any OA–related questions and find out more about the new University policy and how it applies to law publications and the Law School more broadly. To find out more about the University’s policy, click here.

 

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Open Access Good Practice at Northumbria

We’ve just published an update on our Open Access Good Practice blog about our work over the past 6 months on our Jisc-funded Pathfinder project. The update includes details of case studies of OA in three UK HEIs, a cost modelling tool, and a decision-making tool for academic staff:

mapreading by wockerjabby CC BY-NC-SA 2
mapreading by wockerjabby CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Since the last update in March, we’ve had a significant policy announcement from HEFCE on Open Access in the next REF, as well as RCUK’s response to the Burgess review of Open Access implementation. HEFCE’s announcement in particular has shifted the goalposts for OA compliance in the next REF, by deferring the deposit upon acceptance requirement by a year to 1st April 2017. Response from the sector has been mixed, with some welcoming the chance to further embed OA systems and processes, while others bemoan confusing and mixed messages.

RCUK’s response to the Burgess review was less controversial, confirming that they accept and will implement all recommendations, including the formation of a Practitioner Group, making ORCID a requirement, and a review of the algorithm to apportion OA block grant. More recently, RCUK have also set out their arrangements for monitoring of the 2014/15 OA block grant, the deadline for which is 30th October which suggests a busy autumn ahead for research and library staff! Northumbria’s implementation of ORCID has advanced considerably over the past year, and our work on the Jisc-ARMA funded ORCID pilot project has allowed the University to embed ORCID sign up into the postgraduate research student workflow on project approval and at annual progression.

Our Pathfinder has continued to be active over Spring and Summer 2015. Both Northumbria and Sunderland have been further developing their own internal processes, procedures and awareness raising work, but we have also made significant progress in three areas of our workplan. In summary:

  1. Case studies: we have published case studies of good practice and challenges at three UK HEIs
  2. Cost modelling: we have developed and released an early version of our OA cost modelling tool
  3. Decision making: we have developed and released an early version of an OA decision-making tool for academic staff

We’ve also been continuing to engage with the wider Pathfinder programme to disseminate our work (at the June ARMA conference and an upcoming Jisc-ARMA webinar) and developing ideas for a touring OA workshop which we’re planning on rolling out over the autumn this year.

You can read the full update on our blog.

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Guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social sciences

A guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social science researchers has been released as part of the OAPEN-UK project. The guide aims to help researchers to understand the opportunities and challenges associated with publishing a scholarly monograph in open access. It is freely available online and free print copies are available to order: http://oapen-uk.jiscebooks.org/oaguide/.

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HEFCE Adjust REF Open Access Policy

HEFCE have today published a letter to universities outlining key changes to their Open Access policy for the next REF. These include: deposit on acceptance now comes into force in April 2017, rather than 2016; there is now an exception to the deposit requirement for outputs available via Gold OA; “inadvertently non-compliant” outputs can be made compliant retrospectively.

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Research Support: The Essentials – 30th June – 2nd July 2015

Longleat Maze by Antony Theobald CC BY-NC-ND 2.0The University Library, Research and Business Services and the Graduate School are joining up to present a series of workshops, briefings and drop-ins for postgraduate research students, early career researchers and academic staff.

We will also be holding a lunchtime showcase highlighting the various services and materials available to researchers internal and external to the University.

Please take a look at the programme for further details and to book sessions.

Places are limited, so please book early!

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Pilot Launched: Funding Open Access for Post-Grant FP7 Publications

Launching in Spring 2015, a pilot aimed at stimulating publishing in Open Access journals in Europe will provide funding to cover all or part of the costs of post-grant open access publishing arising from projects funded under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The pilot forms part of the EU-funded OpenAIRE2020 project.

The €4m fund is aimed at European researchers to cover the costs of Open Access publishing for post grant FP7 publications.

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