Royal Society Fellowships Workshop – 6 September 2018

 

Royal Society covers life & physical sciences including engineering but excluding medical

Lucy Saddleton and Katie Lisanti @Royal Society

Katie Saddleton- Scheme Manager, UK Grants (particularly Fellowships)

Fellowships – they are really flexible, encourage shared parental leave, can accommodate sick leave, parental leave etc. You are all humans and RS will support you.

There are additional free training opportunities available for RS Fellows, workshops, training, mentoring, MP pairing scheme. Funding schemes include:

  • University Research Fellows can apply to have a PhD student included in the Fellowship
  • ECR Fellowships
  • Senior Research Fellowships
  • Industry & Innovation – Fellowships & New Short Industry Fellowships
  • Industry & Innovation – APEX Award, Paul Instrument Fund
  • Research Capacity & Infrastructure – Research Grants

Lucy Lisanti – International Exchanges Manager

International Collaboration & Travel – International Exchanges, JSPS Postdoc Fellowship, Newton International Fellowship (ECR from Newton Countries), Newton Advanced (Early to Mid from Newton Countries), Royal Society Newton Fund (International Fellowships)

GCRF – International Collaboration (bolstering current collaborations), Challenge Led Grants (one off award), FLAIR Fellowships (African researchers to work in sub Saharan /Africa Universities

 Application Process – Flexi-Grant – Flexi grant deadline is now 3pm not midnight

 What are we looking for?

Think of it like a job interview, track record, creativity, excellent scientific merit

Royal Society don’t mind if you stay at your institution or if you move, and you can transfer your grant/fellowship if you move.

 Tips for the Interview

  • For ECRs – how is this a route to independence
  • Why do you want to stay at institution – having family nearby is a valid reason.
  • Need to do an Elevator Pitch
  • Hold mock interviews before hand
  • There are videos about the interview process on RS website
  • Need a really good lay summary, understandable by someone who does not have a discipline specific knowledge.

Scheme notes can change between rounds!! Make sure you are accessing the most up to date version.

 Other things to Note

RS do not publish success rates due to variation of award year on year – for some schemes success rates are not high so don’t want to put people off!!

Limited feedback at each stage – further down process you get the more feedback that you get.

Can apply again if unsuccessful (except Henry Dale which is joint with Wellcome Trust, where you need to complete a pre-application pro-forma).

 Fellowship Case Studies

Claudia Schneider – Newcastle

University Research Fellowship

Leave lots of time for application

View another person’s proposal

Good to do a mock interview

Route to independence – how is work different to what you have been doing before,
how can you expand your group, what is your next publication

Lars Erik Holmquist- Northumbria

Wolfson Research Merit Award

Salary increase to help recruit someone you might not have been able to recruit otherwise

Biggest benefit is being part of RS network & accessing training

Digital Disruption Network

Del Atkinson – Durham

Royal Society Industry Fellow (can be either way, industry to academic or academic to industry)

Having a great idea and why you are the right person to do this at this time – why you, why now – what are you skill sets?

Working with industry, start small and build, be flexible

Don’t do it if you’re not interested

PANEL SESSION – Q&A

RS are not risk averse, they expect a project to have ambition and stretch the applicant.

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Royal Society – Research Grants: Deadline 19th December 2017

Do You Remember the Future by JD Hancock CC BY 2.0
Do You Remember the Future by JD Hancock CC BY 2.0
Do You Remember the Future by JD Hancock CC BY 2.0

The Royal Society has recently launched the latest round of their Research Grants scheme, with a closing date of 19th December 2017.

These awards provide up to £20k of ‘seed corn’ funding for early stage researchers for the purchase of specialised equipment, consumable materials and/or travel and subsistence for field research. The scheme covers all disciplines in the life and physical sciences (this includes engineering, computer sciences, earth sciences, and environmental sciences).

Find out more about the scheme and how to apply here:

https://royalsociety.org/grants-schemes-awards/grants/research-grants/

Northumbria staff: please send a near final draft of your proposal to your Faculty Research Funding and Policy Manager by 7th December 2017 at the latest so that we have time to do a basic review and check costs before sending for Faculty approval on the 12th December. If you are proposing to use the grant to purchase equipment, then please obtain a quote from a supplier (including VAT and any shipment costs) and include that in the documents you send over. You should also discuss any proposed equipment purchase with the relevant technical team.

Please ensure you meet the eligibility criteria outlined below before you start working on a proposal. If you are unsure or wish to discuss further, please get in touch:

  • Hold a PhD or equivalent qualification.
  • Be based at an eligible UK organisation and a UK resident at the time of application
  • Be within the first five consecutive years, at the time of application, of either:
    • their first permanent independent academic research post
    • a named limited-tenured/fixed-term academic research post, obtained in open competition (Note that tenure must cover the duration of the award).
  • Be fully independent researchers with access to their own lab space (in other words post-doc researchers funded by a grant on which someone else is PI are not eligible)

Northumbria staff can have a look at a few previously successful proposals here (though please note these were prepared in eGap, so the forms will look a little different to the new Flexi-Grant system): https://one.northumbria.ac.uk/service/rbs/Pages/Research-Resources/Applying-for-Funding/Developing-Costing-Proposals/Northumbria-Research-Bid-Repository/Royal-Society.aspx

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Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship

The Royal Society invites applicaitons for the Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship to support outstanding scientists in the UK at an early stage of their research career who require a flexible working pattern due to personal circumstances such as parenting or caring responsibilities or health issues.

Closing date – 12 January 2015

For details see the Royal Society website.

 

 

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Royal Society – International Exchange Schemes

Looking for funding to explore new collaborations with leading scientists overseas through either a one-off visit or bilateral travel?? Look no further, the Royal Society has an International Exchanges Scheme to stimulate new collaborations between scientists in the UK and overseas. The scheme covers all areas of the life and physical sciences, including engineering, but excluding clinical medicine.

Applicants may request:

  • up to of £3,000 for one-off travel lasting up to 3 months
  • up to £6000 for multiple visits to be completed within 1 year (including a maximum of £1000 for research expenses)
  • up to £12,000 for multiple visits to be completed within 2 years and cost share projects fixed at 2 years (including a maximum of £2000 for research expenses)

For further details see the Royal Society website.

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Digital Organisms: BBSRC call for research consultation

The ultimate realisation of predictive biology lies in the development of ‘digital organisms’ – collections of integrated models underpinned by quantitative data, which together represent key biological systems and processes. The UK is well placed to take a leading role in this long term, international challenge.

BBSRC strategic plan – Exploiting new ways of working

BBSRC recently announced a community consultation on digital organisms, digital models of biological systems which permit effective bioengineering and biotechnology work. The consultation will be of potential interest to those working in the various life sciences, computing, bioinformatics and related disciplines, as well as physical sciences and engineering which have frequent interdisciplinary crossovers in this area.

Douglas Kell, BBSRC’s Chief Executive, commented in a blog post today that the consultation will “feed into an expert working group … set up in the area” and help shape BBSRC policy and future funding directions on this issue.

The deadline for responses is 3rd September.

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Northumbria comes to CHI 2012

Northumbria University is involved in 26 contributions to the prestigious CHI 2012 conference in Austin, Texas. You can read about them all here:

CHI/Northumbria: It’s the Experience

Experts from the Schools of Life Sciences, Design and Built and Natural Environment are taking part in the conference this year, with contributions ranging from digital cheque books for eighty somethings, interventions to change energy usage to teenage cool, killer apps and building design.

CHI is the premier international conference on human-computer interaction, taking place this year between 5th and 10th May. This year’s conference is expected to draw in over 2,500 professionals from over 400 countries.

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EPSRC Wants Innovative Solutions to Flood Risk

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Council are looking for an interdisciplinary mix of researchers to attend a “sandpit” event on Innovative Solutions to Flood Risk in April 2012.

Sandpits are collaborative residential workshops where small groups of researchers (20-25 people) from a range of disciplines work together over a number of days to generate project proposals for a specified theme. The benefits of taking part are significant: you get to collaborate with other leading researchers on a relevant topic, and there is a relatively high chance of proposed projects being funded. More details are given in the call for participants [PDF]:

The scope of the Sandpit will address the three Risk Themes identified in the report:
• Understanding Risk
• Managing Probablility
• Managing Consequence

It is not expected that these themes will operate in isolation as there are many issues which may be seen to cut across these themes. The Sandpit intends to explore the engineering and physical science aspects of these key areas whilst recognising that this is a multidisciplinary area.

The call document strongly emphasises the fact that EPSRC are not focusing on one particular disciplinary area: “Applications are encouraged from diverse research areas across engineering, physical sciences, natural environment, life sciences, the social sciences and the arts and humanities”. Nor is track record in flood risk management or engineering solutions to flooding essential to success: “Please note that we are not looking for your academic publication or research track record but rather evidence of how you might approach multidisciplinary problems in a novel area.”

The assessment is based on the following criteria:

  • The ability to develop new, adventurous and highly original research ideas
  • The potential to contribute to research at the interface between disciplines
  • The ability to work in a team
  • The ability to explain research to non experts

To participate you need to fill in a two-page expression of interest form and send to sandpit@epsrc.ac.uk by 20th February 2012.

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