Diary Date: Library – Researcher Development Programme 31 October-11 November 2016

The University Library is running the Researcher Development Programme from 31 October-11 November 2016.

This programme of workshops has been designed to support the development of knowledge, core competencies and transferable skills identified in Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) www.vitae.ac.uk/rdf as the key elements of a successful researcher.

The workshops include: Keeping up to date with new research, Planning and searching for your literature review, and Measuring research performance. There are also bitesize briefings to advise you on how to raise your research profile and providing guidance on copyright.

For the full programme and times see https://cragside.northumbria.ac.uk/Everyone/skillsplus/database_uploads/55388720.pdf

Bookings are taken via the Library online calendar, click on the session you wish to attend to start the booking process: http://libcal.northumbria.ac.uk/rdw

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EndNote workshops – November 2015 to February 2016

endnote image

Suzie Kitchin, Skills Development Librarian at Northumbria University Library:

The Library provide Endnote Introduction and EndNote Advanced workshops for postgraduate research students, early career researchers and staff. Sessions are held at Coach Lane and City Campus libraries.

You can book online now. The workshops run throughout the year and sessions are now available for November through to February. Due to high demand we have scheduled additional workshops for January. Places are limited, so please book early!

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Diary Date: Library – Researcher Development Week 2-6 November

The University Library are running the Researcher Development Week from 2nd-6th November.

This programme of workshops has been designed to support the development of knowledge, core competencies and transferable skills identified in Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) www.vitae.ac.uk/rdf as the key elements of a successful researcher.

The workshops include: Keeping up to date with new research, Planning and searching for your literature review, and Measuring research performance. There are also bitesize briefings to advise you on how to raise your research profile and providing guidance on copyright.

For the full programme and times see https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/static/5007/llspdf/skills/RDWatthelib.pdf

Bookings are taken via the Library online calendar, click on the session you wish to attend to start the booking process: http://libcal.northumbria.ac.uk/calendar/rdw.

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Library workshops at Northumbria Research Conference

Workshop by Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung CC BY-SA 2.0

This is a guest post by Suzie Kitchin (University Library):

Workshop by Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung CC BY-SA 2.0
Workshop by Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung CC BY-SA 2.0

Members of the Library’s Research Support team are delivering workshops and providing a library stand at Northumbria’s Research Conference on Wednesday 20th May. This is to encourage to find out how the University Library can support your research. Details about the Conference can be found at www.northumbria.ac.uk/nrc2015

The team will be on hand throughout the event:

  • We are delivering two workshops on Maximising your research profile
  • There will be an information stand in City Campus East foyer throughout the Conference
  • Find out about new collections 2014-15, how to request new resources and information on special collections.
  • Delegates will have the opportunity to ask questions about the University’s new Open Access Policy.
  • A £50 Eldon Square voucher will be awarded to one lucky researcher who visits the Library stand before the lunchtime prize-giving.

We encourage you to register for the conference, attend one of our workshops and join us at our stand.

Our workshop will run twice during the event in room CCE 011:

  • 10.45-11.45am
  • 2.30-3.30pm

Do come along and chat with us about how we can support your research.

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The University Library are running Researcher Development Week from 2nd – 6th March

This is a guest post by Michelle Walker, Research Support Librarian.

This programme of workshops has been designed to support the development of knowledge, core competencies and transferable skills identified in Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) www.vitae.ac.uk/rdf as the key elements of a successful researcher.

The workshops include: Keeping up to date with new research, Searching for your literature review, Measuring research performance and Mindmapping for researchers

There are also bitesize briefings to advise you on how to raise your research profile, Open Access at Northumbria and provide guidance on copyright.

For the full programme and times see https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/static/5007/llspdf/skills/RDWatthelib.pdf

Bookings are taken via our online calendar, click on the session you wish to attend to start the booking process:    http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/skillsdev-resdev

 

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Library Workshop – Searching for your Literature Review

At the University Library Researcher Development Week, the library was inundated with requests to attend Searching for your Literature Review and so they  are running 2 extra workshops on 

  • Tuesday 25th November 2.30-4pm  at City Campus Library
  • Wednesday 3rd December 9.30-11am at City Campus Library

Develop strategies to help you search for, and evaluate, a range of information sources for your literature review.

This workshop will focus on the planning and searching aspects of a literature review and will signpost you to information on how to write a literature review. A pre-requisite of attending this session is to consult an introductory online package which contains the basics on which this workshop builds upon. This maps to the RDF’s sub domains of Knowledge base (A1) and Cognitive abilities (A2).

Bookings are taken via the online calendar, click on the session you wish to attend to start the booking process.

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University libraries encouraged to work with archives

Research Libraries UK (RLUK) and The National Archives (TNA) have jointly commissioned the production of a guide to collaboration between the archive and higher education (HE) sectors.

The guide will cover:

  • The mechanics of partnership formation
  • Sustaining collaborations
  • An overview of HE funding opportunities
  • A glossary of key academic terms and explanation of academic drivers and KPIs

More information here (via Research Professional).

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Unique Author Identifiers: ORCID, Scopus ID, Researcher ID – what’s the difference?

I posted this earlier on Northumbria’s ORCID blog as part of our Jisc-funded project to embed ORCID across researcher career paths. I’m not an expert by any means on the topic of unique author IDs, but the Library, which is running the project, felt it would be good to get a non-librarian’s point of view on this issue, so I did some research and this is what I found:

Fingerprint by CPOA (CC BY-ND 2.0)
Fingerprint by CPOA (CC BY-ND 2.0)

“As we’ve mentioned previously, there is a problem in overcoming “standards proliferation” fatigue when promoting any new research tool or ID standard. The web has enabled an unprecedented level of sharing and connectivity, especially with regards to research, but the downside of opening up the floodgates means you need better ways of filtering information and finding what’s relevant.

In the context of research, unique author identifiers are one way to solve the problem of author ambiguity. Being able to consistently and accurately identify the author of a piece of research is valuable for researchers (because it means you can quickly find other work by the same author and ensure your own work is linked to you) and for administrators and librarians (because it’s vital to be able to manage and report on the research your institution has produced).

Several unique author identifiers have been developed to address this issue in recent years, but the three main ones are: ResearcherID (developed by Thomson Reuters and used in Web of Science and related products); Scopus Author ID (developed by Elsevier and used in Scopus and related products); and ORCID (developed by ORCID Inc., which is a non-profit, community-driven organisation, based in the USA but with international membership).

At a basic level, all three tools do more or less the same thing; that is, uniquely identify an author and link this unique ID with his/her publications/outputs. However, there are important differences between them and reasons why you may need more than one.

The ownership of these IDs is an important signal of their use. ResearcherID is used to identify authors and enables users to build a publication profile and generate citation metrics from Web of Science (assuming you have access to this product, usually provided through your institution). Scopus Author ID is automatically assigned to all authors and also ensures this information is accurately reflected in the various Scopus tools such as search and analytics (e.g. citation tracking, h-index etc.).* Researchers benefit from this by clearly identifying their work, but so do the publishers: ensuring their information is up-to-date and accurate means that they raise the quality of their associated search, discovery and analysis products, which potentially leads to increased traffic to these services and, ultimately, sales.

orcid-logoORCID, by contrast, is not owned by a publisher, but is a community-driven organisation which includes representatives from a range of stakeholders on its board of directors, including funders (Wellcome Trust), publishers (Thomson Reuters, Wiley-Blackwell, Nature, Elsevier) and universities (Cornell, Barcelona, MIT). While ResearcherID and Scopus ID are linked to the journal output of their respective publishers, ORCID is neutral in this respect; you can associate an ORCID with an output in any article from any publisher, and you can also attach the identifier to datasets, equipment, media stories, experiments, patents and notebooks. ORCID does not offer any “added value” services such as citation analysis linked to the acquisition of an ORCID (as is the case with ResearcherID and Scopus ID) – its mission statement is really very simple: “to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications by creating a central registry of unique identifiers for individual researchers and an open and transparent linking mechanism between ORCID and other current researcher ID schemes.”

If you are a researcher, then, depending on your discipline, you may need to sign up for all three. But this is not as difficult as it sounds. Both ResearcherID and Scopus Author ID have relatively painless ways of linking up with your ORCID (see ResearcherID-ORCID integration and Scopus ID-ORCID integration). This will automatically link the research linked to ResearcherID/Scopus ID to your ORCID and ensure that publication lists can be imported from one ID system into another.

If you are a researcher and you haven’t yet signed up for any of these author identification tools then the best way forward is to sign up for an ORCID. ORCID is rapidly becoming the standard, and is supported by many publishers, universities and funders.”

* 07/08/14 Following recent discussion with Scopus on Twitter, I’ve clarified the wording here. All authors are/can be assigned Scopus IDs/ResearcherIDs – not just authors published in Elsevier/Thomson Reuters journals.

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Library will shed light on Endnote, open access and more at #NUResearch14

LightbulbGlow by Noe Lecocq CC BY-SA 2.5

This is a guest post by Suzie Kitchin, Research Support Librarian:

Members of the Library’s Research Support team are delivering workshops and providing a library stand at Northumbria’s Research Conference on Wednesday 21st and Thursday 22nd May. The purpose of this is to encourage you as academic staff and postgraduate research students to find out how the University Library can support your research. Details about the Conference can be found at http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/researchandconsultancy/resconf14/.

The Library team will be on hand throughout the event:

  • We are delivering workshops as part of the breakout sessions;
  • There will be an information stand in City Campus East foyer throughout the Conference;
  • You can register for ORCiD at the stand, including the opportunity to win £50 in vouchers! If you haven’t heard of ORCiD before, it is a digital identifier which uniquely identifies each researcher, and provides links between you as the researcher and your professional activities.

We encourage you to register for the conference, attend one of our workshops and join us at our stand in the foyer of City Campus East.

Our workshop will run three times during the event in room 021:

  • Wednesday 21st May – 09:30-11:00 and 2.00-3.30
  • Thursday 22nd May – 11:00-12:30

Do come along and chat with us about how we can support your research.

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Library Researcher Development Week: 3rd – 7th March 2014

Workshop by Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung CC BY-SA 2.0

Workshop by Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung CC BY-SA 2.0This is a guest post by Michelle Walker, Research Support Librarian:

The University Library are running Researcher Development Week from 3rd-7th  March.

This programme of workshops has been designed to support the development of knowledge, core competencies and transferable skills identified in Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) as the key elements of a successful researcher.

The workshops include:

  • Keeping up to date with new research;
  • Searching for your literature review;
  • Measuring research performance; and
  • Mindmapping for researchers

There are also bitesize briefings to advise you on how to raise your research profile, make your research visible and provide guidance on copyright.

For the full programme and times see http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/static/5007/llspdf/skills/rdptt.pdf

Bookings are taken via ask4help@northumbria.ac.uk

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