British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants – 2017 Round Open

Piggy bank with coins by 401k CC BY-SA 2

The ever-popular British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grants scheme is now open for applications.

Grants are available to support primary research in the humanities and social sciences. Applications should be between £500-£10,000 over up to two years. Applications for collaborative or individual research projects are equally welcome under this scheme. Applications from international groups of scholars are also welcome, provided there is a UK-based scholar as lead applicant.

Funds are available to: facilitate initial project planning and development; to support the direct costs of research; and to enable the advancement of research through workshops or conferences, or visits by or to partner scholars. Applicants may seek support for any combination of eligible activity and cost up to the overall limit of £10,000. The Academy will assess applications equally on their merits, with no preference as to the mode of enquiry.

The deadline for applications is 5pm UK time on 24th May 2017. 

PLEASE NOTE: Please contact your Faculty Research Funding and Policy Manager as soon as possible if you intend to apply to check your own Faculty’s internal deadlines: as this scheme usually gives rise to a high volume of applications, there are internal processes in place to ensure any bids submitted are high quality and are supported by the relevant Faculty.

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British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants – Closing 6th May

Piggy Bank with Coins by 401K 2013 CC BY-SA 2.0
Piggy Bank with Coins by 401K 2013 CC BY-SA 2.0

The ever-popular British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grants scheme is currently open and this round closes on 6th May 2015.

British Academy/Leverhulme Trust – Small Research Grants

Up to £10,000 is available to fund primary research in the humanities and social sciences.

Funds may be used to:

  • facilitate initial project planning and development;
  • support the direct costs of research;
  • enable the advancement of research through workshops or conferences, or visits by or to partner scholars.

If you’re interested in applying to this round, please get in touch with your Faculty Research Funding and Policy Manager as soon as possible.

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The Leverhulme Trust invites nominations for the Philip Leverhulme prizes

These prizes recognise the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. The prize scheme makes up to thirty awards of £100,000 a year, across the following subject areas:

  • Classics
  • Earth Sciences
  • Physics
  • Politics and International Relations
  • Psychology
  • Visual and Performing Arts

Each prize can be used over a two or three year period.

Closing date for nominations:  14th May 2015

Eligibility and further information can be access here.

 

 

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Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships: 2015 Call Open for Applications

Academic by Tim Ellis CC BY-NC 2.0
Academic by Tim Ellis CC BY-NC 2.0

Leverhulme has announced that the 2015 call for their popular Early Career Fellowships scheme is now open for applications:

Leverhulme – Early Career Fellowships

The deadline is 5th March 2015. Applications must be made through Leverhulme’s online grants system.

Early Career Fellowships provide funding for early career researchers in any discipline (except medical and clinical) who do not currently have and have not previously held a full-time permanent academic post in a UK university. The cut-off date is five years from PhD viva, which means anyone who had their viva before March 2010 is not eligible (unless you have had a career break). If you are currently or have been registered for a doctorate then you may still apply as long as you have submitted your thesis by the closing date.

Funding provided is for 50% of a Fellow’s salary for 3 years (up to £24K/annum), with the expectation that the Fellow is moved into a permanent position after this time. The other 50% of the salary must be contributed by the University. Up to £6,000 per annum may be requested in addition to cover research expenses.

Please get in touch with your Faculty Research Funding and Policy manager at an early stage if you are interested in applying.

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Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships: Next Round Open 2nd Jan 2014

Academic by Tim Ellis CC BY-NC 2.0The Leverhulme Trust has given advance notice of the next round of their Early Career Fellowship scheme. The 2014 round will open on 2nd Jan and close on 6th March. Although the scheme is not yet open to applications, the guidance notes [.doc] are already available.

Who can apply?

Early career fellowships (ECF) are, as the name suggests, intended for researchers at an early stage in their career. Researchers based in any discipline are eligible to apply. The aim is to fund a substantial research project which will lead to publishable outcomes, but also to enable the fellow to move towards a permanent position. To be eligible to apply you must not yet have held a permanent academic post.

All candidates must also hold a doctorate or “equivalent experience” by the time the Fellowship begins. You can apply if you are in the final stages of your doctorate as long as you submit your thesis by 4pm on the closing date, 6th March. You can only apply if you are within 5 years of your doctoral viva (unless you’ve had a career break for family or other reasons).

Note that priority is given to “applicants who show evidence of mobility during their academic careers to date”. Given that the scheme is so competitive, it’s unlikely you’ll be in with a chance unless you have moved between institutions.

What’s available?

An ECF provides 50% of the Fellow’s salary costs (up to £23,000) for a standard 3-year full-time Fellowship, plus up to £6,000 per year towards the Fellow’s research expenses. A part-time fellowship over a longer period may be an option provided the applicant can justify the need for this arrangement. The remainder of the Fellow’s salary must be met by generally available funds from the institution (i.e. not matched with funding from another grant).

The Leverhulme Trust are expecting to fund 80 fellowships in the forthcoming round. Note that the success rate last year was 12% [PDF], and that it has generally hovered between 11% and 14% since 2008.

How do I apply?

You need to apply online on the Leverhulme Trust’s e-grants system. Note that before the scheme opens on 2nd Jan you can’t access the form, but you can consult the extensive online application guidance notes [.doc] which take you through each field. You should also take note of the guidance on choosing the right referee recently published by Leverhulme.

If you’re interested in submitting an application, please get in touch with the Research Funding and Policy Manager for your Faculty at an early stage to discuss.

 

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British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grant Call Open

Piggy Bank with Coins by 401K 2013 CC BY-SA 2.0The popular British Academy/Leverhulme Small Grants is once again open for applications. The deadline is 16th October.

Small grants support humanities and social science research projects between £500 and £10,000. Funding is available for:

  • initial stage project planning and development, e.g. pilot studies
  • direct costs of research, e.g. library and archive visits or data collection
  • advancement of research through workshops and conferences
  • visits by or to partner scholars

Collaborative or individual projects are equally welcome, and projects may involve a group of international scholars as long as the lead applicant is based in the UK. Note that grants are not intended solely to support conference organisation, except where the conference is to disseminate research carried out as part of the grant.

Projects should plan to start between 1st April 2014 and 31st August 2014. Applications should be made online via the British Academy eGap website. Please contact RBS at an early stage for help and support with the bid.

If you’re not able to put a bid into this round, or the start dates don’t suit your project, please note that there will be another call in March 2014 with a deadline in April 2014.

 

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Leverhulme Trust: Plain English is Important

Knots by What Indie Nights CC BY-NC-SA 2.0A recent interview with Gordon Marshall, director of the Leverhulme Trust, in Research Professional [£ – subscription required] covered the Trust’s newly released Research Programme Grants call, including its focus on the “nature of knots”, the ability to take risks, and the importance of writing applications in plain English. It’s worth a read if you have an RP subscription.

Research Programme Grants are the Leverhulme Trust’s only major departure from operating a “responsive mode” policy. Each year the Trust selects a number of themes and invites bids on those. Usually the themes are broad enough to cover a range of disciplinary approaches, and indeed this year’s focus is on encouraging and stimulating interdisciplinary applications. The current themes are:

  1. The Nature of Knots
  2. Sustainable Living

You can find out more about the background behind the themes in the Research Programme funding guide and also in the RP interview linked above. On the first theme in particular, Marshall says: “Knots are an emerging area in a number of sciences—polymer science, life sciences. They’re a phenomenon in biochemistry, where independently people have begun to realise that these things are important. They’re also a phenomenon in mathematics. There’s enough there that we could get a cross-disciplinary take on that title.”

On the importance of plain English, Marshall emphasises that the Leverhulme board consists of nine ex-senior board level members of Unilever, so there’s no guarantee that someone with an expertise in a specific sub-discipline of biochemistry, say, is going to be reading your application. Another common mistake, according to Marshall, is spending too much time on the literature review and too little talking about what you’re actually going to do in the proposed project: “This is more common among early career researchers,” he adds. “They leave themselves half a page to say what they will actually do by way of study. What matters is the methodology, what’s the research design, what are they going to do and why?”

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